Redemption

large_lost-2

Last Wednesday night was the season finale of LOST. 

There are few TV shows that I watch, but I love this one. I blogged about it a while ago and one of the things that I mentioned I enjoyed is the depth of character development. Some people really hate the show, and I get it. You can’t just watch a few minutes, even an episode, and really dig it–it requires a bit of patience and knowledge of how the story unfolds (even then you might not love it, but it would be tougher to dislike). 

Once you get into it, it’s hard to let go. Once again, I’m reminded–especially by the finale–here’s what I love about the show: it’s comprised of people seeking redemption. And it relates to their own personal journey, and to some degree their personal leadership, on this pathway to redemption. 

Ultimately, what it is that each of the characters are trying to do is try to realize their purpose, and each are working towards some type of redemption for things done–or perhaps undone–from their past. And, in LOST, the Island represents, and their life on it is a shot at just that. 

I love stories about redemption. Not just those in Lost–but Paul Potts. Susan Boyle. Slumdog Millionaire. It’s the feel-good-we-can-all-do-something-better part that I love. 

Ultimately, more than perhaps most of us will even acknowledge, this desire for redemption tugs at each of us. To some more than others. But each of us has a part of their life that they want to redeem from the past.

I’ve got mine, and you’ve got yours.

Some are worth sharing, and others are so internal and personal that they’re not for public consumption. And some are so deep within us we don’t even know it exists, at least not yet. Especially the unexamined lives. 

It’s one of the many very cool things about life in college–each Semester is, in some ways, the start of a new beginning. It’s like a “do-over” every few months. Even if you were pretty good the previous Semester, you’ve got a chance to be better. And if you botched up the prior Semester, you’ve got a chance to do it right again…a faster shot at redemption. 

But in real life it’s much slower, harder, more intentional, and the payoff is bigger but the work is tougher. Yet it’s really rewarding, and ultimately each of us have a part of us that seek it. That’s the story of Lost. And it’s also a glimpse into each of us.

No doubts, take Lasix only as prescribed by your doctor. Levitra is one of the best-known medications of all when. What is the most significant info you must study about levitra vs cialis? Most doctors say the effectiveness of Levitra is well documented. Absolutely, a sexual problem refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual life. Whilst sex is not vital for good heartiness, its doubtless significant for anyone. Why it happen? What kinds of professionals treat sexual diseases in men? A common class of antidepressants, which include Zoloft can kill the mood in bedroom.

Lost in Lost

I don’t watch that much TV.

bobbyflayAnd, the TV that I do watch is usually TIVO’d. Usually, we catch up during a break on weekends — sometimes it’s weeks after a show has aired that we finally have time to watch. Interesting how a product that wasn’t even in existence ten years ago has now become a verb. Like Google. Maybe someday, the same will happen with Univera.

In fact, our TIVO purchase was the genius of my wife — I resisted for quite a while, but it’s been one of the best purchases we’ve made since it enables us to watch a few great shows on our time schedule — so it’s truly been a time management tool.

(Such a “red” personality comment to have to position TIVO as a productivity tool for it to be justifiable).

A few of my favorite TIVO shows generally are:

Bobby Flay. It’s a once weekly thirty-minute cooking show that I will periodically watch with Zoe curled up on my lap. She loves to cook about as much as I do, so we get immersed together, figure out good recipe ideas, and then will sometimes try our hand to replicate the experience on weekends. (www.bobbyflay.com)

73818136AW006_Meet_The_PresMeet the Press. It’s not the same without Tim Russert, who was an absolute champion of a human being. I wish I could have met him. Regardless, it’s still THE show to watch to stay abreast of current political events. This series I watch alone — I can’t even get our dog to join me on this one. I also usually try to catch ten minutes of highlights of the nightly news, though it’s simply faster to read the news on CNN or ABCNews, so I often get impatient with televised news. (Meet The Press)

officeThe Office. Simply hysterical. It’s rather stupid humor, and I think you can only really appreciate it fully if you work in an office setting. This is really just mindless entertainment. Erica, at moments, will enjoy this one with me. (www.nbc.com/the_office)

And, finally, our favorite: LOST.

Some shows and movies I enjoy because they’re educational, others comical, and some inspirational. But there are a few dramas that are vastly deep and insightful. That’s LOST. If you watch just one episode you won’t understand my sentiments, but if you can follow the series you’ll understand the depth of the character development that some brilliant writing brings to life.

lost1As some of you know, the LOST season premiere (in its final season) took place this week; before the feature presentation, the two co-producers did a one-hour special where they narrated the “behind the scenes” thinking on character development. This was exceptionally interesting, because it helped bring to light what I think it is that I love so much about the show.

lost2It’s not just the depth and diversity of the characters, or the mystery of the storyline, or the fairly robust cinematography (for a TV show, at least).

What I love, I think, is that it’s a story of redemption and of remaking a new life, while being drawn to one’s destiny.

It’s a set of woven stories that includes both doubt and hope. Despair and dreams. Conflict and harmony. Prison and freedom. See, the show doesn’t just take place in the present tense — there are constant flashbacks for each character in his or her past. So while you start to understand who the characters are today, you really learn a lot about who they were in the past — as well as who they want to become. There are glimpses of both heroism as well as heresy — even in the same individuals, and often that is the case with each of us as well.

There’s a part of it that’s the same draw that, I think, compels so many people to Relationship Marketing — and Univera. It’s this idea that who we are isn’t necessarily who we want to become. Or, at least, who we were in the past isn’t the same person we are today and tomorrow. It’s this innate desire to “remake” oneself, to try to right wrongs from the past, or to seek a greater purpose of better contributions to humankind, or simply to a family or oneself. It could be that I’m so passionate about Univera that I simply find common threads in what it is that we do with everyday life, or even everyday TV shows.

Yet, there really is a parallel. There are only a handful of industries and companies where the opportunity exists for most people to begin again. And maybe not just a second time, but a fourth or even tenth.

To (re)build a secondary or primary income, regardless of background, experience, or financial resources. To work and contribute in meaningful ways in building up a team of people, in establishing a culture, and participating in something life changing for oneself and millions of others. To restore and renew one’s physical health, perhaps even after years of deterioration and neglect.

It’s the LOST storyline: an opportunity for redemption, or, as we say it, an opportunity for Renewal.

No doubts, take Lasix only as prescribed by your doctor. Levitra is one of the best-known medications of all day. What is the most significant information you must study about levitra vs cialis? Most doctors say the effectiveness of Levitra is well documented. Absolutely, a sexual problem refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual life. Whilst sex is not vital for good health, its doubtless significant for anyone. Why it happen? What kinds of professionals treat sexual diseases in men? A common class of antidepressants, which include Zoloft can kill the mood in bedroom.